A journey toward justice.

This week marks the Jewish holiday of Passover. The theme of Passover is liberation from exile. It’s a tale of perseverance and I think it serves as a great opportunity to begin a dialogue around some of these issues.

Passover has four famous questions, typically recited by the youngest child. Each question gets at a component of the introductory question ‘why is this night different from all other nights?’ Yet, while reflecting on the holiday this week I kept coming back to the same question: Is this night any different than the exodus?

During the Passover Seder we symbolically reenact the exodus journey from Egypt. We engage with the community, welcoming the stranger and encouraging all who have no place to go to join us at our table. But, what if the stranger is the person you passed on your way home, holding a sign and asking for spare change? Would we invite them in or would we give our food and send them on their way? I think the ultimate message in Passover is not that we were slaves and now we are free, the ultimate message is a question; what are we doing with our freedom?

Activism is more than sharing a video on facebook, eating a piece of matzah and retelling our story. As we remember and eat our bread of affliction we need to realize that in our schools and on our streets all over the world many are still forced to eat their bread of affliction (if they have anything to eat at all). In reality, this night is not any different than the exodus for so many. And as long as we remain bystanders, that truth will keep us all in exile.

2 thoughts on “A journey toward justice.

  1. Dear Sarah,

    Wow. I didn’t grow up in the Jewish faith but I’ve always appreciated the traditions I have learned about from others. Thank you for starting the conversation about appreciating our freedoms and questioning how to best use said liberty. Your post is a salient reminder that we are all responsible for upholding, and progressing, social justice.

    Would you mind sharing a bit more about the “bread of affliction” and its symbolism? I am not familiar with the tradition or meaning.

    Thank you, again, for such a great post!

    Peace-
    Amie

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